Learn Pangasinan:  Noun Phrase Linky-Links

Look here’s a bunch of  common nouns.  I’m listing them with definite article say, which means “the for singular objects.

The list is short because this post isn’t really about nouns, it’s about making the linky-link with other nouns and adjectives.

Some Common Nouns

  1. say aso the dog
  2. say pusa the cat
  3. say pusit the squid
  4. say ugaw the kiddo
  5. say abong the house, the home
  6. say kaiba the companion, friend
  7. say dalanan the street, the road
  8. say buek the hair
  9. say eges the belly, the tummy

So if you want to link any of these nouns together in a noun phrase relationship, you have to use a linky-link.  Here are the noun linky-links in Pangasinan:

Linky-links for Pangasinan: 

  • If the first word ends in a vowel, jam the linky suffix -n onto the first word.
  • If the first word already ends in an -n, make it end in linky suffix -y instead.
  • If the first word ends in a consonant, separate the two words with the linky particle na.

Now you can link a bunch of those nouns above together.

  • say abong na pusa the cat’s house
  • say kaiban aso the dog’s companion
  • say eges na pusit the squid’s belly
  • say dalanay ugaw the kiddo’s street

You may have noticed that my English equivalents all came up as possessive apostrophe-“s,” which is one way we link nouns together in English. It’s not the only way we do it in English, so don’t get too hung up it. What you need to know is that you need a suffix or a particle to link nouns in a noun phrase relationship.

If you’re from Santo Tomás, La Unión, you can use a slightly different set of linkers:

  • If the first word ends in a vowel, jam the linky suffix -n onto the first word (same as standard Pangasinan).
  • If that first word ends in -s, use the linky particle na.
  • If the first word ends in a consonant, jam the linky suffix -a onto the first word.

Here’s what you get:

  • say abonga pusa
  • say kaiban aso
  • say uges na pusit
  • say dalanana ugaw

There, easy.  If you want Santo Tomás flavored Pangasinan like I do, you’re going to end up having to know the standard way too, so you can understand your friends in Dagupan. It’s a minor difference.

Now that you know how to link nouns to each other, it’s time to link adjectives to nouns. The rules will look very familiar.

  • If the adjective ends in a vowel, use linky suffix -n.
  • If the adjective ends in a consonant , use the linky particle ya.
  • If the adjective ends in an -an, make it end in -ay instead.
  • For Santo Tomás style, use -n for vowels, and -a for consonants and don’t worry about adjectives that end is -s, they can take -a as well.

Some Common Adjectives

  • baleg big
  • melag small
  • ambanget stinky 
  • bangad naughty, willfully-disobedient
  • bastos naughty, disrespectful, rude
  • dugyot filthy
  • pilipino
  • andeket black
  • ampoti white
  • maabig nice
  • narasan hungry
  • buwag greedy, gluttonous 

Ok, now you can link these handy adjectives to the noun above!  You can say things like Say baleg ya abong, say pilipinon ugaw, say andeket ya pusit, say narasay ugaw, say dugyota pusa. 

Try saying these things:  The white house, the greedy squid, the naughty dog, the rude friend, the big belly.  Make your own combinations!

At first, you’ll be looking back and forth between lists, and using analysis muscles to figure out which linky-link to use.  Keep practicing until you’ve got linky-links in muscle memory.

Noun and Adjective Linkies

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